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EPP 221 - Introduction to River Restoration, Part I: Physical Processes

Dates: March 11-13, 2014

This three-day course provides a wide-angle view of the constantly evolving science and technology of river restoration, giving you an understanding of the full range of skills needed to develop and implement a river restoration project. This course is designed for consultants, natural resources managers, regulators, environmental planners, contractors and others that have an interest in river restoration. It will be led by Dr. Janine Castro, a national expert in river restoration and geomorphology. Topics include:

Stream Energy: flooding v. erosion, energy dissipation, and channel and floodplain roughness

Process & Form: linking drivers to stream processes, inferring process from form

Climate: patterns and predictions for the PNW

Hydrology: hydrographs, flow frequency, stage-discharge relationships, and data analysis

Hydraulics: energy distributions, shear stress, flow types/regimes, roughness, and turbulence

Soils and Vegetation: textures, classification, horizons, and structure, and soil interpretation

Sediment dynamics: sources, mobilization, transport, deposition, measurement techniques 

Geomorphology: landforms, channel morphology, disturbance/recovery, and CMZs

Stream Classification Systems: Rosgen, CEM, Montgomery & Buffington, Strahler, & Schumm

Introduction to Modeling: types, complexity, and assumptions & sensitivity  

Hydraulic Modeling and Applications: HEC-RAS and advanced applications

Case Study - Otter Point: site evaluation, alternatives analysis, design process, and monitoring

Ecomorphology: morphologic adjustments due to flora and fauna             

Facilitator: Janine Castro, Ph.D.

Time: 9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Location: World Forestry Center, Portland, Oregon

Fee: $685

Fee includes: All instruction and program facilitation, resource manual, a certificate of completion for this offering is provided.

Available Professional Credit: 2.3 CEU, 23 PDH.

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EPP 222 - Introduction to River Restoration, Part II: Ecological Processes

Dates: April 15-17, 2014

Successful river restoration projects are planned within a watershed context and incorporate techniques based on the developing theoretical framework for river restoration science. It is no longer enough to be expert in a field of discipline, it is necessary to understand the integral ecological processes and know how to integrate individual expertise with other disciplines.

This required introductory course provides a refresher of basic ecology as it applies to river restoration by starting with a broad overview of ecological concepts and then informing students about specific species and their life histories to reinforce the complexity and connectedness between river systems, species, ecological relationships, and the landscape. The course brings the pieces back together as a whole with a variety of case studies, exercises, and video. The general topics in relationship to river restoration include:

Landscape Ecology and River Restoration Overview

Rivers in Three Dimensions

Instream Structures

Plant Ecology

Role of Beavers in River Restoration

Examples of Connectivity Issues and Implications

Amphibian and Reptile Ecology

Invasive Species

Water Quality Concepts

Overview of Pacific Northwest Salmonids

Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Ecology

Native Fish Ecology (non-salmonids)

Riparian and Floodplain Wildlife

Connectivity: Ecological Role

Case Study - Bull Trout Reintroduction Project

Facilitators: Bianca Streif, Shivonne Nesbit

Time: 8:00 to 5:00 pm

Location: World Forestry Center, Portland, Oregon

Fee: $685

Fee includes: All instruction and program facilitation, resource manual, a certificate of completion for this offering is provided.

Available Professional Credit: 2.3 CEU, 23 PDH.

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EPP 223 - Site Evaluation and Assessment formerly Stream Reconnaissance and Assessment Tools

Dates: September 23-26 2014

(River Restoration Professional Certificate Core Course 3) The success of a river restoration project depends on the understanding of the river system and its function within the watershed. Complex interacting processes occur on a variety of temporal and spatial scales, and numerous tools are available to help analyze these processes and predict the likely impact of restoration measures. The ability to choose and implement assessment methods appropriate to the project at hand can make the difference between expensive studies that yield few useful results, and insightful tools that help guide planning for years.

This course will familiarize participants with the most widely-used assessment and reconnaissance methods in our region, and will provide a framework for developing river restoration assessment and monitoring plans. The focus will be on best practice methods and integrating new studies with watershed-wide and regional corridor studies. Led by John Dvorsky and Liz Gilliam, the course will feature instruction by regional experts in stream corridor evaluation / assessment techniques and modeling. This four day course will teach you the basics of:

Watershed analyses

Interrelationships of watersheds and streams

Geomorphic assessments

Evaluating stream stability

Riparian and aquatic habitat evaluation and assessment techniques

Stream classification

Air photo interpretation

Remote sensing

Data collection and management

Useful models

Monitoring parameters, design, and funding

Integrating regulations and permits

Facilitators: John Dvorsky, and Liz Gilliam

Time: 8:00 am to 5:00 pm

Location: World Forestry Center, Portland, Oregon

Fee: $850

Fee includes: All instruction and program facilitation, resource manual, transportation to/from the field, morning coffee/tea, a certificate of completion for this offering is provided.

Available Professional Credit: 3.1 CEU, 31 PDH.

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EPP 224 - Restoration Design

Dates: November 3-7, 2014

(River Restoration Professional Certificate Core Course 4) Recent research has found that many river restoration designs fail because they were created to achieve a preconceived notion of the ideal form and function of the stream without recognizing the dynamic processes at work in that watershed. Others fail due to lack of sound alternatives analysis and fundamental engineering. The most successful rely on a fusion of stream mechanics knowledge and progressive design techniques. This approach establishes and supports those stream processes that create and maintain channel form and associated habitats.

In this course, participants will learn about a variety of design approaches and steps for alternative analysis of stream restoration projects. A design process will be demonstrated that integrates landscape scale considerations of geology, soils, and hydrology, with stream processes of hydraulics, sediment transport and geomorphology. Alternative analysis will focus on providing resiliency to stream systems in light of dominant stream processes overlain with biologic goals and human values. The overall focus will be on understanding and design of best management practices in the river restoration context, and on use of process-based design approaches. Classroom and field case examples will be used to demonstrate implementation of a variety of design approaches and techniques. Led by Rob Sampson P.E., the course will feature instruction by regional restoration design experts. This five-day course will teach you the basics of:

Obtaining input and scientific information

Placing alternatives in context of geomorphology, hydrology, channel geometry, sediment budget, sediment transport and management

Gathering and analyzing basic data

Surveying, soil mechanics, hydraulics, modeling

Design process, products and practice

Standards, specifications and design notes

Floodplain restoration techniques

Streambank and shoreline protection techniques

Stream channel stabilization techniques

Open channel restoration techniques

Fish stream improvement

Bioengineering techniques

Design drawings – conveying information

Operation, maintenance and monitoring plans

Best management practices

Construction sequencing

Environmental change and building resilience

Facilitator: Rob Sampson, P.E.

Time: 8:00 am to 5:00 pm

Location: World Forestry Center, Portland, Oregon

Fee: $1050

Pre-requisite: Introduction to River Restoration, Part I: Physical Processes

Fee includes: All instruction and program facilitation, resource manual, transportation to/from the field, morning coffee/tea, a certificate of completion for this offering is provided.

Available Professional Credit: 3.5 CEU, 35 PDH.

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EPP 225 - Restoration Project Management

Dates: December 2-4, 2014

(River Restoration Professional Certificate Core Course 5) While river restoration science is complex, many projects fail due to lack of funding and coordination between the partners. In a climate of restricted funding, project management skills and systems are critical to maximizing project cost-effectiveness. In addition, restoration projects depend heavily on collaboration and buy-in of affected landowners, local governments, and other stakeholders. The collaborative nature of river restoration projects requires the cooperation of multiple agencies, consultants, and stakeholders at every phase of project selection, planning and implementation. Many river restoration teams undertake complex and large-scale projects without a full appreciation for these management and communication complexities.

This course will use case studies to lead participants through Project Management principles from Concept to Closeout, providing tools to manage Scope, Schedule, Cost, and Quality.

Facilitated by Timmie Mandish and Janine Castro, speakers will include representatives from state and federal agencies, consulting firms, and non-governmental organizations. This three day course will teach you the basics of:

Project management principles and goals management

Project levels, structures, schedule, and fiscal management

Building the project: choosing and managing interdisciplinary teams

Communications and information management

Project scheduling

Stakeholder assessment and management

Environmental compliance

Project levels, structures, schedule, and fiscal management

Restoration politics

Facilitators: Timmie Mandish and Janine Castro, Ph.D.

Location: World Forestry Center, Portland, Oregon

Fee: $685

Fee includes: All instruction and program facilitation, resource manual, transportation to/from the field, morning coffee/tea, a certificate of completion for this offering is provided.

Available Professional Credit: 2.3 CEU, 23 PDH.

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EPP 233 - RiverRAT: River Restoration and Analysis Tools

Date: TBD

The Pacific Northwest continues to be an international leader in the field of stream restoration, and as such, regulatory reviewers are often faced with novel project types that are not yet supported by industry standards.  While appropriate and necessary given the state of our river systems, this does pose unique challenges when reviewers are faced with evaluating a stream restoration project. 

To address this challenge, NOAA Fisheries and USFWS collaboratively commissioned research in 2008-09 to develop a Science Document and accompanying tools to support more consistent and comprehensive reviews of stream management and restoration proposals.  The Science Document synthesizes the body of knowledge in fluvial geomorphology and river management, and presents it in a way that is accessible to a broad scientific and management audience.  Accompanying the Science Document are three tools: (1) a Screening Matrix that relatively ranks risks due to project and stream response potential; (2) a Project Information Checklist to assist in evaluating whether a proposal includes all the information necessary to allow critical and thorough project evaluation; and (3) a project evaluation tool named RiverRAT that guides reviewers through the steps necessary to critically evaluate the quality of the information submitted, the goals and objectives of the project, project planning and development, project design, geomorphic-habitat-species relevance, and risks to listed species.  The tools and supporting Science Document are publically available at www.restorationreview.com, and are now being commonly used for review by various state and federal agencies. 

This course will provide an overview of the physical science underpinning river restoration, use of the Screening Matrix, overview of the Project Information Checklist, and in class use of RiverRAT utilizing a real restoration project.  This course is intended for anyone involved in the planning, design, implementation, monitoring, funding, and/or review of stream restoration or management actions.

Time: 9am to 4:30pm

Location: Portland, OR

Instructor:Janine Castro, Ph.D., R.G., Geomorphologist, US Fish & Wildlife Service and National Marine Fisheries Service, Portland, OR

Fee:$195

Fee includes: All instruction and program facilitation, morning coffee/tea, a certificate of completion.

This course meets one Elective requirement for the PSU River Restoration Professional Certificate.

Available Professional Credit: .8 CEU, 8 PDH.

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EPP 231 - Principles of Streambank Analysis & Stabilization

Dates: TBA

This three-day lecture and field course is designed for both public and private professionals engaged in stream investigation, management, stabilization and restoration. The course is designed to clearly demonstrate the essential links between research, analysis, design, project implementation, and post-project evaluation. Lectures will introduce the fundamental concepts linking streambank processes and geomorphic adjustments in the fluvial system. Field work will allow students to evaluate and quantify force and resistance mechanisms that control streambank-erosion processes, failure mechanisms, and the importance of basal scour to sustained bank retreat in alluvial channels. Hands-on modeling will provide students with the opportunity to investigate the factors which control bank stability, while also recognizing the significance of these factors when designing mitigation measures. All students will be provided with bank-stability modeling software for future use.

Course highlights include:

Review of fundamental principles behind channel adjustment

Role of bank erosion in fluvial adjustment and sediment yields

Mechanics of streambank erosion

Field reconnaissance and investigation methodologies

Bank-stability modeling

Guiding principles for bank stabilization

Post-project appraisal approaches

Prerequisites: Students attending this course should have solid algebraic and analytical skills.  Experience using Microsoft Excel or similar spreadsheet programs isdesirable. A laptop computer is also recommended for running bank-stability software provided during class.

Time: 8am to 5pm

Location: World Forestry Center, Portland, OR

Instructors: Andrew Simon, Ph.D., Geomorphologist, Colin Thorne, BSc,Ph.D., Professor of Physical Geography, University of Nottingham, UK and Faculty Affiliate, Department of Geography, Portland State University; Janine Castro, Ph.D., R.G., Geomorphologist, US Fish & Wildlife Service, Portland, OR

Fee: $685

Fee includes: All instruction and program facilitation, resource manual, transportation to/from the field, morning coffee/tea, a certificate of completion for this offering is provided.

This course meets one Elective requirement for the PSU River Restoration Professional Certificate.

Available Professional Credit: 2.0 CEU, 20 PDH.

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EPP 232 - Streambank Soil Bioengineering Technical Training

Dates: October 14-15, 2014

This streambank soil bioengineering technical training is a 2 day classroom introduction to Bioengineering treatments.  Included is a brief review of stream dynamics, hydrology, hydraulics, sediment transport, riparian vegetation concepts, principles for implementing bioengineering treatments, riparian plant propagation, and plant identification.  The workshop includes the presentation of a variety of streambank soil bioengineering practices with instructor provided firsthand account of their design and installation.  Workshop photographs depict applications across the United States, Canada, Afghanistan, and Guatemala.  Material and concepts presented in the workshop are intended for a variety of participants from the beginner to intermediate levels of experience.  The course is not recommended for those with extensive experience working in riparian zones utilizing bioengineering principles.  Some basic engineering equations are presented in the review portion, but there are no complex derivations or lengthy discussion of the equations.  There is considerable discussion of riparian plants, how they grow, and how to propagate them since plants are the tools used to increase the strength and structure of the soil and in turn to reduce streambank erosion.  This two day course will teach you the basics in:

  • Streambank soil bioengineering treatments

  • Using riparian vegetation, both woody and herbaceous

  • Plant propagation techniques

  • Riparian plant identification

  • Floodplain restoration techniques

  • Streambank and shoreline protection

  • Stream channel stabilization

  • Fish habitat improvement

  • Best management practices

Instructor:Chris Hoag and Ed Giering, PE, PLS
Time: 8:00 – 5:00
Location: Portland State University, Portland, Oregon
Fee:     $540
Fee includes: All instruction and program facilitation, resource manual and cd, morning coffee/tea, a certificate of completion for this offering is provided.

Available Professional Credit: 1.5 CEU or 15 PDH

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EPP 721 - Winter Twig ID

Dates: Cancelled

This class will emphasize field character identification of the wetland species and associated upland buffer species found in the Puget lowland region of Washington (approximately 12 trees and 60 shrubs, including willows). The format will be a lecture/laboratory setup. The taxa examined will include common lowland, freshwater (and a few estuarine) species. Fresh material will be provided if in season. Winter characteristics (buds, leaf scars, pith, and bark) will be covered.  The class instruction will be oriented towards the needs of shoreline planners, delineators, OHWM determinations, and restoration.

Class will begin with a short lecture covering the terminology and salient morphological characteristics needed for a taxonomic identification of the species of choice, field characteristics, some ecological aspects of the species’ common habitat, commonly associated species, distribution, potential use for restoration purposes, and any special ecological requirements. Lecture materials will include drawings, slides, and plant material.

Time: 9 am to 5 pm

Location: Portland State University

Instructor: Sarah Spear Cooke, Ph.D., and Kate McWiggins, Botanist

Fee: $250

Needed in Class: Cooke, Wetland Plants of Western Washington and NW Oregon.

Recommended: Gilkey and Packard, Winter Twigs

Available Professional Credit: .8 CEU, 8 PDH.

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EPP 716 - Basic Wetland Delineation

Second Session Scheduled for June 16-20 has been cancelled due to low enrollment.

Dates: March 24-28, 2014

A great training course needed by anyone who intends to delineate,
restore, or work with wetlands. The course includes both lecture and
"hands-on" field work.

Following completion of this course, you will understand how to identify
and delineate wetlands according to the procedures and standards
established by the US Army Corps of Engineers, with particular emphasis
on the Regional Supplements for the Western Mountains, Valleys and
Coast, as well as the Arid West.  The course is designed and taught by
expert practitioners in the field of wetland delineation with decades of
field experience. This course is appropriate for both professionals and
students; it qualifies as credit towards certification through the
Society of Wetland Scientist Professional Certification Program.

Our PSU Basic Wetland Delineation Training Course, though nationally
applicable, focuses on wetlands of the Pacific Northwest. Topics include
wetland parameters (hydrology, hydrophytic vegetation, and hydric soils)
and regional field indicators, technical criteria, delineation
procedures, disturbed areas guidance, and recognizing problem areas.
Class text includes lecture notes and field handouts.

Instructors: Phil Scoles, Charlie Newling

Time: 8:00am to 5:30pm

Location: Portland State University, Portland, Oregon

Fee: $1170

Available Professional Credit: 3.8 CEU, or 38 PDH.

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EPP 717 - Hydric Soil Indicators for Regional Supplements

Dates: April 22-23, 2014

This is a recommended 2-day advanced course for wetland delineators. The course covers the fundamental relationship between soil formation and hydric soil indicators, in the context of delineating wetlands according to the procedures and standards established by the new regional supplements for the Western Mountains, Valleys and Coast, plus the Arid West.

This lecture and field course will focus on a "hands-on" understanding and the ability to interpret landforms, document soil profiles, describe redoximorphic features, and hydric soil determination.

One-third of the course will be lecture; the remaining time will involve numerous field stops within the Portland Metropolitan area. Field study will include examining redoximorphic features, describing drained hydric soils, and properly applying hydric soil indicators. Other topics include land forms and geomorphology, soil taxonomy and chemistry, sampling depths and measurements, and analysis of wetland situations lacking hydric soil indicators.

This course requires some wetland hiking, carrying field gear and some labor. Hiking/walking may involve slippery or wet, uneven ground that is often without trails.

Time: 8 am to 5 pm

Location: Portland State University, Portland, OR

Instructor: Phil Scoles

Fee: $540

Fee Includes: Resource manual, coffee and snacks, and field transportation.

Text: None

Available Professional Credit: 1.6 CEU, or 16 PDH.

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EPP 719 - Wetland Hydrology Indicators and Problem Situations

Dates: May 28-29, 2014

This two-day course will provide wetland professionals with an in-depth understanding of hydrologic conditions that form and sustain wetlands.  Instruction will focus on identification of hydrology sources (precipitation, ground water, streams), as well as the hydrology indicators specified by the Western Mountains, Valley & Coast and Arid West regional supplements to the 1987 Wetland Delineation Manual. 

The course will examine delineation situations where one or more of the evaluation parameters has been disturbed or missing (problematic situations).  Common examples of these situations include grazed pastures, cultivated fields, drained/artificial wetlands, seasonal wetlands, and riparian wetlands.  These examples are common occurrences in urban areas within the Western U.S., as well as other regions.  This course is intended for wetland professionals wanting to expand their knowledge of wetland hydrology and better assess disturbed delineation sites This course has a high participant-instructor ratio, so there are numerous opportunities for project specific examples that participants want to discuss.  It qualifies as credit towards certification through the Society of Wetland Scientist Professional Certification Program, as well as elective credit toward the PSU River Restoration Professional Certificate.

The course instructor has over 25 years of wetland delineation and training experience, with an emphasis on hydric soils, wetland hydrology, and disturbed site delineations.  The course format will be mostly instruction in the mornings and field visits in the afternoon.  The field visits will teach participants to apply wetland hydrology indicators, examine hydrology sources, document problematic situations, and refine delineation skills.  The following is a list of lecture topics and field activities included in this course:

Hydrology Concepts, Water Sources, Growing Season

Wetland Hydrology Indicators (Arid West and Western Mts, Valley & Coast)

Problematic Situations Overview (Veg, Soils & Hydrology)

Vegetation Problematic Situations

Field Documentation of Wetland Hydrology Indicators

Field Exercise -- Problematic Hydrology and Vegetation Situations

Review of Field Exercise and Data

Hydric Soil Problematic Situations

Wetlands Periodically Lacking Hydrology

Problematic Hydric Soil Situations and Hydrology Indicators

Problematic Vegetation and Hydrology Situations

Problematic Soils, Veg. and Hydrology Situation Field Exercise

This course requires some wetland hiking, carrying field gear and some labor. Hiking/walking may involve slippery or wet, uneven ground that is often without trails.

Time: 8:00 am to 5:00 pm

Location: Portland State University, Portland, OR

Instructor: Phil Scoles

Fee: $540

Fee includes: All instruction and field activities, lecture notes, transportation to/from the field sites, morning coffee/tea, breakfast snacks.  A certificate of completion for this offering is provided.

Text: None

Available Professional Credit: 1.6 CEU, 16 PDH.

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EPP 720 - Wetland Plants of the Pacific Northwest

Date Changed: June 9-13, 2014

This five day laboratory and field wetland plant identification course focuses on teaching you to identify wetland plants. You will learn the taxonomic identification skills necessary to identify most common species of wetland plants in the Pacific Northwest. Students will be introduced to the National List of Plants Species that occur in wetlands, and will consider the indicator status of species seen in various habitats across the wetland landscape. Lecture-labs (with lots of microscope and hand-lens work) and field study will cover terminology, field characteristics, keying, habitat preferences, species distribution and species assemblages. Emphasis will be placed on teaching field characteristics of the wetland plants, including how to key sedges, grasses, rushes, and willows. Participants should have some familiarity with our NW flora and be aware of the National List of Plants that occur in wetlands. An "advanced beginner" course, students are NOT expected to be proficient in plant taxonomy or wetland ecology. This course is intended for those interested in:

Wetland plants

Delineation

Restoration

Native landscaping

Function assessment (including the Hydrogeomorphic Approach)

Time: 9 am to 5 pm

Location: Portland State University, Portland, Oregon

Instructor: Sarah Spear Cooke, Ph.D., and Kate McWiggins, Botanist

Fee: $1020

Fee Includes: Instruction, resource manual, specimens, microscope use, a very significant manual covering all the wetland plant families, complete with diagrams, notes, and hard to find keys.

Needed in Class: Cooke, Wetland Plants of Western Washington and NW Oregon.

Recommended: Hitchcock, Flora of the Pacific Northwest

Available Professional Credit: 3.2 CEU, 32 PDH.

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EPP 725 - Freshwater Mussels of the Pacific Northwest

Dates: August 26-27, 2014

This combination classroom and field trip will provide participants with an understanding of the ecology of freshwater mussels, their identification, complex life history and status in the Northwest. Exotic bivalves, including zebra and quagga mussels and the Asian clam, will also be covered, as well as native bivalves other than mussels.

Students will learn the relationship of mussels to native fishes, their importance as indicator species and environmental factors leading to their decline. Recent genetic work on local species will be reviewed. Past Native American use of mussels will be covered. Techniques for sampling mussels that can be used by the students will be outlined. The status of mussels as seen by natural resource agencies and groups will be reviewed as well as additional information needed by agencies for mussel protection. Take-home handouts (including the field guide, Freshwater Mussels of the Pacific Northwest) will be provided to assist with identification, life history information and information on non-native mollusks. This class will enable participants to understand, participate in and advocate protection and management that freshwater mussels need in the Northwest to continue to survive. 

The classroom part of the workshop will consist of lectures with slides by the instructor, presentations by other mussel biologists, videos and examination of mussel shells.  The second day is dedicated to site visits at two local waterways to examine and discuss mussel habitat requirements and look for mussel shells and live mussels.

The class will be an introduction to Northwest mussels.  It is intended for persons with some biological background but not necessarily specific knowledge of mollusks.

Time: Class (8/26)- 9 am to 5 pm

Time: Field (8/27)- 9 am to 3 pm

Location: Class - Portland State University

Location: Field - TBA

Instructor: Allan K. Smith

Fee: $475

Fee Includes: Instruction, and resource manual.

Available Professional Credit: 1.4 CEU, 14 PDH.

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EPP 751 - NEPA: Overview and Refresher

Dates: TBA

“If you work for the Federal Government or your projects receive any federal funding, you need to understand and know how to work with NEPA.” 

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is the most important environmental law in the United States.  This workshop will cover the procedural requirement of NEPA and the information that must be included in environmental impact documents. The course will address Environmental Impact Statements (EISs), Environmental Assessments (EAs) and Categorical Exclusions (CATEXs)

This class is for anyone dealing with NEPA, including agency regulators, engineers, scientists, consultants, planners, and attorneys. 

You will benefit by learning: 

  • The fundamentals of NEPA
  • NEPA’s legal and regulatory framework
  • How to determine when NEPA applies
  • Using CATEX's
  • How to prepare Environmental Assessments (EA's), and Findings of No Significant Impacts
  • Determining when an EIS must be prepared
  • The importance of “purpose and need” and “alternatives“
  • The key topics to include in an EIS
  • How to prepare adequate, defensible, and useful environmental documents
  • The current standards of judicial review, and
  • How to integrate NEPA with other federal, state, and local requirements and permits.
  • Common NEPA mistakes and how to avoid them

 

Time: 8:30 am to 5 pm

Location: Portland State University

Instructor: Ronald Bass, Coauthor of The NEPA Book, A Step-by-Step Guide on How to Comply with the National Environmental Policy Act; and Chis Moelter

Fee: $250

Available Professional Credit: 0.8 CEU, 8 PDH

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EPP 753 - Environmental Planning, Permitting, and Project Management

Dates: May 14, 2014

“Project managers don’t like costly surprises. especially regulatory surprises!” 

This course should not only prevent regulatory surprises, but teach you to coordinate your planning so that you may integrate all your permits at the planning stage, identify environmentally superior alternatives, develop realistic project schedules, and ultimately reduce costs.

Many projects trigger the need for multiple environmental permits and certifications that require similar information and involve parallel permitting schedules. This one-day course will focus on how to integrate federal, state, and local environmental regulations and permits into a “no-surprises” project plan. Emphasis will be on providing the resources and information needed to conduct a preliminary constraints analysis, understanding the various permitting processes and how they relate to one another, and the importance of early and frequent coordination with the appropriate resource agencies. 

The course presents regulatory constraints in a graphic, geography-based manner utilizing case studies to illustrate the planning and permitting process. The primary regulations covered include local land use, the Clean Water Act (wetlands and water quality), the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and the National Historic Preservation Act. As examples of local regulations, e.g., Oregon’s wetland removal/fill law and Statewide Planning Goals will be covered briefly.

This course is designed for professionals faced with projects that are potentially constrained by natural resource issues, permitting schedules, and connections to natural resource function and values.  It is particularly important for land managers, regulators, environmental planners, and civil engineers, landscape architects, and contractors.

This course does not cover any one of the regulations in exhaustive detail. As a planning methodology, it will provide a basis for understanding common regulatory integration issues.

Instructor: Shane Latimer, Ph.D., Ecologist/Environmental Planner, Latimer Environmental LLC

Time: 9am to 4:30pm

Location: Portland State University

Fee: $250

Fee Includes: Instruction, course material, manual

Available Professional Credit: 0.8 CEU, 8 PDH

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EPP 720b - Grasses, Sedges and Rushes of the Pacific NW

Dates: October 7-8, 2014

This two day laboratory course will emphasize field character identification of the most common freshwater, estuarine wetland, and associated upland buffer species found in the Puget lowland region of Washington and Oregon. The format will be a lecture/laboratory setup. Ample dried material will be available for everyone to practice their keying skills.

Each class will begin with a short lecture covering the terminology and salient morphological characteristics needed for a taxonomic identification of the species of choice, field characteristics, some ecological aspects of the species’ common habitat, commonly associated species, distribution, potential use for restoration purposes, and any special ecological requirements. Lecture materials will include drawings, slides, and dried plant material. The class instruction will be oriented towards the needs of shoreline planners, delineators, OHWM determinations, and restoration ecologists.

Instructor:Sarah Spear Cooke, Ph.D.

Time: 9am to 5pm

Location: Portland State University, Portland, OR

Fee: $475

Fee Includes: Instruction, resource manual, use of microscopes, and coffee

Available Professional Credit: 1.6 CEU or 16 PDH credit

Required Text: Hitchcock and Cronquist, 1973, Flora of the Pacific Northwest

Or

Hitchcock, Cronquist, Ownby, and Thompson, 1971, Vascular Plants of the Pacific Northwest, Part 1: Vascular Cryptogams, Gymnosperms, and Monocotyledons

Required Materials (bring to class as these are not provided): Hand Lens (10x) and dissecting kit that includes a probe, razor blade, ruler, and fine tipped tweezers

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EPP 662 - Wetland Mitigation Part 1

Dates: TBA

The wetland mitigation site assessment and design course begins at "square one" for wetland scientists, regulators and other professionals intending to design and/or review mitigation projects. Lectures will focus on site assessment variables for soil conditions, expected hydrology, seed germination, flood risk, compatibility with adjacent lands uses, and related factors.  Within these topics, the instructor will include additional discussion on soil formation, wetland hydrology and plant wetness tolerance. 

Field visits will include examination of several completed mitigation projects, plus workshop-style site assessments to provide participants with hands-on experience to determine the suitability of prospective mitigation site.  The final day of class will involve "pulling it all together" to design a mitigation area and to provide an itemized list of benefits, conflicts, and opportunities.

The regulatory framework for wetland mitigation will also be presented; however, that framework would not be exclusive to Oregon. 
It is helpful for participants to have previously taken the basic wetland delineation class or other advanced PSU wetland classes (hydric soils, plant identification, etc.); however, there are no required prerequisites for this mitigation class.  There will be several evening reading assignments distributed during class.

Instructor:  Phil Scoles

Location: Portland State University
Time:  8:00AM - 5:30PM
Fee:  $780

Fee Includes: Substantial reference manual, morning coffee, water and snacks in the field. There is no text that covers this topic.
Available Professional Credit: 2.4 CEU, or 24 PDH.

To register please access our website:

http://epp.esr.pdx.edu/registration.html


EPP 662b - Wetland Mitigation Part 2 (see description of Part 1 above)

Dates: Postponed until 2015

Wetland Mitigation Part 2 is a three-day course for weltland and natural resource professionals who have already completed Wetland Mitigation Part 1 (site assessment, design and planning). As with Part 1, the course will focus on the "design-build" approach to construct and maintain mitigation wetlands and other wetland restoration projects. The course will "breakdown" mitigation costs to better understand the variables that need to be accounted for in construction bidding/solicitations. Some of those variables include construction equipment, use of erosion control measures, grading contingencies, nursery stock and seed procurement, and planting installation. Pre-construction planning and construction supervision will be presented, along with numerous project examples to give insight to common pitfalls encountered in the construction phase. Examples of post-construction as-built reports and corrective grading prescriptions are provided with field site discussions about mitigation successes, failures and need for flexibility during the construction phase. Mitigation maintenance is another component of the curriculum that is integrated into the field discussions. 'field visits will include examination of several completed mitigation projects, plus practical exercises to assess existing conditions and trends and to develop an adaptive management plan. While class discussions will include mitigation monitoring, this topic is a very minor component (watch for another PSU course offering about monitoring in 2014). As with Part 1, the course is intended to apply to multiple jurisdictions; thus, the curriculum will not by exclusive to Oregon.

Instructors: Phil Scoles amd Guest Lecturers

Time: 8:00 am to 5:30 pm

Location: Portland, OR Portland State University

Fee: $780

Fee Includes: Substantial reference manual, morining coffee, water and snacks in the field. There is no text that covers this topic.

Available Professional Credit: 2.4 CEU, or 24 PDH.

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